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MEMORIES OF 2023 ~ Sally Mosley



On reflection, it’s been a great year of walks with many Peaks and a few Lows as well as trig point summits. We’ve had some glorious sunny days, blue sky encounters but also muddy paths a plenty!

Before the January ‘big freeze’ arrived, Nellie and I managed a round of Sir Williams Hill’s summit as it was high and dry, elevated from swollen rivers or low-lying bog. These conditions seemed to dominate 2023, challenging my knowledge of suitable routes.

As daylight hours expanded, Nellie and I surfaced earlier and earlier, often heading off well before breakfast to watch the sun rise. I particularly remember Deep Dale and Sheldon looking beautiful when bathed in a honey-coloured glow of first light.

Some of our walks are ‘big sky’ adventures when we wander over an expanse of moorland or high hilltops that afford magnificent panoramic views. Abney Moor, Brown Knoll and Stanage Edge spring to mind. We were lucky to be able to walk these popular sites mid-week and avoid the ‘madding crowds’, so enjoying mile upon mile of peace and solitude.

Spring and summer are a time for wild flower walks which we enjoyed in Litton Dale and Chee Dale, being proper nature rambles through wonderful White Peak paradise. For woodland wanders I chose Shining Cliff Woods near Ambergate and part of the Goyt Valley near Taxal for some arboreal exploration and tree hugging.

I’m sure everyone knows that I love a bit of history and architecture on my walks. The pretty villages of Winster and Alstonefield did not disappoint, but it was Harpur Hill that turned out to be an interesting surprise with war-time remnant features, industrial heritage and old quarries that I discovered by following a variety of footpaths, tracks and trails.

Nellie and I both struggle when the mercury rises and it becomes heatwave hot. Our walks then often stay close to home and become much shorter when we venture out, searching for some shade.

One of the most exciting walks of 2023 was when I went ‘out of area’ to Torside beyond Glossop. It was quite a drive from home but well worth it because I came across the most divine little church in the process of restoration and learnt some fascinating snippets. St James Church, sited on the old Woodhead Road has a history dating back to 1450. The original house of worship there was probably constructed of wood. It was founded by Sir Edmund Shaa who was born in nearby Mottram. He was apprenticed to a London goldsmith and later appointed engraver to the Royal Mint at the Tower of London and Calais. In 1482 he became Lord Mayor of London. The current structure is being sympathetically and lovingly restored by a handful of volunteers and I was very fortunate to have a personal guided tour by Stephen and Denis, both retired firefighters.

I’ve had some ‘huff puff’ hikes in the last twelve months including an ascent of Jacob’s Ladder from Edale. I was ably assisted by nutty Nellie who still likes to pull on the lead – it can be handy at times!

Wet weather in autumn seemed to excel, with a return to gloop and muddy paws. However, on one occasion I had to turn back straight away, as on arriving at Longshaw for a walk over Totley Moor I discovered I’d annoyingly left my boots at home. Perhaps this was meant to be though, as returning the next day Nellie and I had a glorious close encounter with a group of red deer that were peeping at us from their hideaway in a large bed of bracken. This led me to discover that a gathering of deer can also be described as a bevy or parcel. You learn something new every day!

Long walks require sustenance, so Nellie and I have enjoyed many rucksack snacks, occasional ‘cuppa and cake’ tearoom visits and even the odd pub lunch.

Thanks to maps and apps we have never got lost, but we have from time to time had to deviate from a right of way in order to avoid cows, calves and bulls.

All told it’s been a grand year with too many highlights to mention. We are both looking forward to more walks in 2024 and wish all our readers and followers a most wonderful Christmas and a year ahead of good health and much happiness.

Sally and Nellie xxOn reflection, it’s been a great year of walks with many Peaks and a few Lows as well as trig point summits. We’ve had some glorious sunny days, blue sky encounters but also muddy paths a plenty!

Before the January ‘big freeze’ arrived, Nellie and I managed a round of Sir Williams Hill’s summit as it was high and dry, elevated from swollen rivers or low-lying bog. These conditions seemed to dominate 2023, challenging my knowledge of suitable routes.

As daylight hours expanded, Nellie and I surfaced earlier and earlier, often heading off well before breakfast to watch the sun rise. I particularly remember Deep Dale and Sheldon looking beautiful when bathed in a honey-coloured glow of first light.

Some of our walks are ‘big sky’ adventures when we wander over an expanse of moorland or high hilltops that afford magnificent panoramic views. Abney Moor, Brown Knoll and Stanage Edge spring to mind. We were lucky to be able to walk these popular sites mid-week and avoid the ‘madding crowds’, so enjoying mile upon mile of peace and solitude.

Spring and summer are a time for wild flower walks which we enjoyed in Litton Dale and Chee Dale, being proper nature rambles through wonderful White Peak paradise. For woodland wanders I chose Shining Cliff Woods near Ambergate and part of the Goyt Valley near Taxal for some arboreal exploration and tree hugging.

I’m sure everyone knows that I love a bit of history and architecture on my walks. The pretty villages of Winster and Alstonefield did not disappoint, but it was Harpur Hill that turned out to be an interesting surprise with war-time remnant features, industrial heritage and old quarries that I discovered by following a variety of footpaths, tracks and trails.

Nellie and I both struggle when the mercury rises and it becomes heatwave hot. Our walks then often stay close to home and become much shorter when we venture out, searching for some shade.

One of the most exciting walks of 2023 was when I went ‘out of area’ to Torside beyond Glossop. It was quite a drive from home but well worth it because I came across the most divine little church in the process of restoration and learnt some fascinating snippets. St James Church, sited on the old Woodhead Road has a history dating back to 1450. The original house of worship there was probably constructed of wood. It was founded by Sir Edmund Shaa who was born in nearby Mottram. He was apprenticed to a London goldsmith and later appointed engraver to the Royal Mint at the Tower of London and Calais. In 1482 he became Lord Mayor of London. The current structure is being sympathetically and lovingly restored by a handful of volunteers and I was very fortunate to have a personal guided tour by Stephen and Denis, both retired firefighters.

I’ve had some ‘huff puff’ hikes in the last twelve months including an ascent of Jacob’s Ladder from Edale. I was ably assisted by nutty Nellie who still likes to pull on the lead – it can be handy at times!

Wet weather in autumn seemed to excel, with a return to gloop and muddy paws. However, on one occasion I had to turn back straight away, as on arriving at Longshaw for a walk over Totley Moor I discovered I’d annoyingly left my boots at home. Perhaps this was meant to be though, as returning the next day Nellie and I had a glorious close encounter with a group of red deer that were peeping at us from their hideaway in a large bed of bracken. This led me to discover that a gathering of deer can also be described as a bevy or parcel. You learn something new every day!

Long walks require sustenance, so Nellie and I have enjoyed many rucksack snacks, occasional ‘cuppa and cake’ tearoom visits and even the odd pub lunch.

Thanks to maps and apps we have never got lost, but we have from time to time had to deviate from a right of way in order to avoid cows, calves and bulls.

All told it’s been a grand year with too many highlights to mention. We are both looking forward to more walks in 2024 and wish all our readers and followers a most wonderful Christmas and a year ahead of good health and much happiness.


Sally and Nellie xx



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